Category Archives: conditional formatting

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Conditional Formatting Gem in #Excel: Highlight the N Closest Values to the Mean of a Range in a Filtered List by David Hager

 

I am extending the closest value technique I published recently to calculate the same based on a filtered list.

https://dhexcel1.wordpress.com/2017/07/04/using-conditional-formatting-in-excel-to-highlight-the-n-closest-values-to-the-mean-of-a-range-by-david-hager/

In this demonstration, the goal is to highlight values in a numeric range that are clostest to the average of that range in a filtered list. So, we first make the range dynamic with the following defined name formula.

NumRange =OFFSET(Sheet1!$A$1,1,,COUNTA(Sheet1!$A:$A)-1)

Then, we modify that range to include only filtered values.

fNumRange =IFERROR(IF(SUBTOTAL(3,OFFSET(NumRange,ROW(NumRange)-MIN(ROW(NumRange)),,1)),NumRange,””),””)

For more information on the SUBTOATL function as used here, see:

https://dhexcel1.wordpress.com/2017/01/08/creating-a-unique-delimited-string-from-an-excel-filtered-list-by-using-the-textjoin-function-by-david-hager/

Next, we use that range to make an array of the absolute differences of each value of the range from the average.

ABS_Range =IFERROR(ABS(fNumRange-AVERAGE(fNumRange)),””)

We can then define a cell for the number of values to highlight.

N_Values =$B$2

The heavy work is done by the next formula, which creates an array of the N values to be higlighted.

Num_Array=INDEX(NumRange,N(IF(1,TRANSPOSE(MATCH(SMALL(ABS_Range,ROW(

INDIRECT(“1:”&N_Values))),ABS_Range,0)))))

This formula returns the position of each smallest deviation in the 2nd argument of the INDEX function, which then returns the values corresponding to those deviations, based on a filtered list. The use of the formula syntax needed to do this with the INDEX function is explained at the following link.

https://excelxor.com/2014/09/05/index-returning-an-array-of-values/

This formula can now be used in the creation of the CF, where CF Formula is =SUM(N(A1=Num_Array)), starting at A1 and applied to all of Column A.

The result of this CF is shown below.

CF_Closest_Filtered1

The example file can be downloaded here.

CF_Closest_Filtered

Using Conditional Formatting in #Excel to Highlight the N Closest Values to the Mean of a Range by David Hager

 

Conditional Formatting (CF) is one of the most powerful tools in Excel for visualizing data. Because CF can use formulas as input to the CF process, the ability to create formulas based on different data visualization requirements is important. In this demonstration, the goal is to highlight values in a numeric range that are clostest to the average of that range. So, we first make the range dynamic with the following defined name formula.

NumRange =OFFSET(Sheet1!$A$1,1,,COUNTA(Sheet1!$A:$A)-1)

Next, we use that range to make an array of the absolute differences of each value of the range from the average.

ABS_Range =ABS(NumRange-AVERAGE(NumRange))

We can then define a cell for the number of values to highlight.

N_Values =$B$2

The heavy work is done by the next formula, which creates an array of the N values to be higlighted.

Num_Array=INDEX(NumRange,N(IF(1,TRANSPOSE(MATCH(SMALL(ABS_Range,ROW(

INDIRECT(“1:”&N_Values))),ABS_Range,0)))))

This formula returns the position of each smallest deviation in the 2nd argument of the INDEX function, which then returns the values corresponding to those deviations. The use of the formula syntax needed to do this with the INDEX function is explained at the following link.

https://excelxor.com/2014/09/05/index-returning-an-array-of-values/

This formula can now be used in the creation of the CF, where CF Formula is =SUM(N(A1=Num_Array)), starting at A1 and applied to all of Column A.

The result of this CF is shown below.

 CF_Closest1

The example file can be downloaded here.

CF_Closest

 

Excel: Conditional Format Rows in List 1 that are Not in List 2 by David Hager

 

I was watching one of Mike Girvin’s excellent Excel videos today. The technique demonstrated in the video was to use Power Query to extract items in list 1 that are NOT In list 2:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JztEKJ-XkCU

I realized that this was the opposite of the conditional formatting technique I had just published.

https://dhexcel1.wordpress.com/2017/06/24/excel-conditional-format-rows-in-one-list-that-are-in-another-list-by-david-hager/

So, for the sake of completeness, I decided to modifyvmy technique to emulate Mike’s technique.

Only a minor modification of the the CF formula was neccesary to produce the opposite condition.

=ISERROR(FIND(CONCAT($A2:$E2),CONCAT($I$2:$M$6)))

You can see the results in the following figure.

 TableAntiCompareCF1

You can download the example file here.

TableAntiCompareCF

 

Excel: Conditional Format Rows in One List that are in Another List by David Hager

 

Here is the scenario. You have a long list with multiple columns and a second list containing records to look up in the first list. All of the records in each row of the first list must be compared with all of the records in the second list.

Here is the conditional formatting formula that will highlight the desired rows. Although it appears surprisingly simple, it took me quite a while to come up with this.

=FIND(CONCAT($A2:$E2),CONCAT($I$2:$M$4))

This formula looks for the concatenated row string in the long string from list 2 and if the FIND function finds the string, a value corresponding to the position of the string is returned. Any number of 1 and above is interpreted in CF as TRUE. Otherwise, the formula produces an error, which is interpeted as FALSE.

This CF formula was applied to list 1 starting at A2.

As you can see from the following figure, the expected rows in list 1 are highlighted.

 TableCompareCF1

Now, if your data happened to be all numbers in each column, a row could be hightlighted by coincidence due to a match in the large concat string. So, don’t use this technique with lists of that characteristic.

I am sure that you will find this technique useful.

You can download the example file here.

TableCompareCF

Using #Excel to Make A Round Robin Tournament Schedule by David Hager

The creation of a round robin tournament is a common topic in a Google search of the subject, and there are a myriad of different levels and complexites demonstrated. I decided to make a calculation model that would make this easy to do.

Starting in cell AK2, the names of the teams in the tournament are listed. For every name entered, a consecutive number must also be entered, starting with 0 in cell AL2. See the following figure.

 rr1

And, that’s all you have to do!

The process runs entirely on Excel formulas – no VBA is used.

The resulting tournament schedule is shown in the following figure (partial view).

 rr2

The workbook is completely unprotected, so feel free to discover how to works. There are a number of interesting and complex formulas used in the design of this model, both on the worksheet, in conditional formatting and in defined name formulas.

It is difficult to visualize the entire tournament bracket at once. Perhaps I will leave that issue as an exercise for the user.

The file can be downloaded here.

 RoundRobin

Enjoy!

 

#Excel Short and Sweet Tip #18 (Toggle Formatting on Worksheet) by David Hager

You might at some point want to view a section of a workbook without any user-applied formatting. It turns out that this is easy to do through conditional formatting. For this example, A4:G10 has data that has a simple table format applied, as shown below.

 Toggle1

There is a Data Validation list option in cell B2, with the list in A1:A2 (On, Off). Then, a conditional format is applied to A4:G10 with the formula =IF($B$2=”Off”,1,0).

 Toggle3

The important part of this process is selecting formatting options that look “normal”, such as no fill, no borders and a black font. When the Off value is selected, the formatting of the table “disappears”, as shown below.

 Toggle2

You can download the example file here.

ToggleFormatting