#Excel Impossibly Easy #1: Return a 1D Array from Non-Contiguous Native 3D Ranges

 

What if I told you that I had 2 non-contiguous 3D ranges in an Excel workbook and I wanted to return a single 1D array from those ranges. Impossible, right? No, it turns out that it is “easy”.

Prior to the introduction of the TEXTJOIN function, this would likely have been impossible. But, this function accepts native 3D ranges as range arguments. See:

https://dhexcel1.wordpress.com/2017/05/23/excel-native-3d-ranges-with-the-textjoin-function-plus-bonus-by-david-hager/

It would have been nice if the technique was only a VBA solution, but although Textjoin is a VBA worksheet function in Excel, VBA will not accept a native 3D range as an argument. Likewise, a pure Excel formula solution would have been nice, and a method dows exist to do this

https://dhexcel1.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/calculating-aggregation-for-internal-numbers-from-strings-in-a-range-by-david-hager/

but it has severe limitations which prevents its use with a relatively large number of cells (maybe 150). The total number of characters that a cell can contain is 32,767 characters. This solution assumes that an average of 6 characters per cell plus a comma for each gives an approximate number of 4500 cells allowed.

Here is the solution.

=ArrayFromCDS(TEXTJOIN(“,”,TRUE,Sheet1:Sheet3!$B2:$D$6,Sheet1:Sheet3!$G$2:$G$6))

It consists of the TEXTJOIN worksheet function with 2 non-contiguous 3D ranges arguments

TEXTJOIN(“,”,TRUE,Sheet1:Sheet3!$B2:$D$6,Sheet1:Sheet3!$G$2:$G$6)

And a simple VBA function which converts a comma delimited string into a 1D array.

Function ArrayFromCDS(MyString As String)

ArrayFromCDS = Split(MyString, “,”)

End Function

In the example file, the array produced contains all of the elements of the two 3D ranges (shown below).

{“Name1″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name4″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name7″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name10″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name13″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name1″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name4″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name7″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name10″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name13″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name1″,”Name2″,”Name3″,”Name4″,”Name2″,”Name7″,”Name7″,”Name2″,”Name11″,”Name10″,”Name2″,”Name15″,”Name13″,”Name2″,”Name19″,”a”,”b”,”c”,”d”,”a”,”b”,”d”,”e”,”b”,”d”,”e”,”f”,”m”,”e”,”f”}

The figure shows this formula in cell I2.

TJ_3dTo1dArray1

I hope that you will find this useful.

The example file can be downloaded here.

TJ_3dTo1dArray

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2 thoughts on “#Excel Impossibly Easy #1: Return a 1D Array from Non-Contiguous Native 3D Ranges

  1. Pingback: #Excel Super Links #133 – shared by David Hager | Excel For You

  2. Pingback: #Excel Super Links #136 – shared by David Hager | Excel For You

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